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Candleston Castle

near Merthyr Mawr, Bridgend, south Wales

Photographs copyright by Ben Jones

Michael Salter 1991

The name Candleston is probably derived from the de Cantelupe family who built a fortified manor house here in the later 14th century. The lands of the manor later became covered with dunes and thus valueless, but the building remained occupied until the 19th century and is consequently much altered. It comprises a D-shaped courtyard about 30m across with a very ruined wall 1.1m thick rising 2m to the wall walk from the inside but rather more above the ground outside, plus a two storey hall block and tower on the east side. The only feature of interest in the hall block is a 15th century fireplace backing onto the tower which contains a solar above a dark cellar with a very flat vault. The tower measures 7.9m by 6.4m and has a parapet on a corbel table around a dark topmost room probably for the use of servants. The solar is reached from below by a straight stair in the thick south wall and has a fireplace, large windows, and a latrine. The wing projecting south from the hall block is a later addition and the range east of the tower is even more recent.

 


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