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Eglwys Gwyddelod Stone Circle

Pennal, Gwynedd, north Wales
OS 135 SH 663002

Photographs copyright 2004 by Jeffrey L. Thomas

Cadw

This is a beautiful monument in a very dramatic setting. It stands on a rocky shelf, a point where several tracks converge. Like so many monuments in such settings, it is designed for maximum impact from one direction - in this case, the south. The track continues westward beyond it and runs along the top of the ridge, passing other cairns and coming down to the valley floor near a fine earthen barrow (visible from the road). These Bronze Age monuments suggest that this trackway, like many others, has its origin in this period.

The circle is relatively small, 8m in diameter with no stone more than 1m high. It is similar to the lower circle at Moel Goedog, but no stone bank or stone in-filling is visible. A single slab of quartz lies at the centre of the circle. It is very probably an original feature, since this perpetually white stone was often used to emphasize significant features of Bronze Age monuments.

The circle consists of five upright stones and two stumps just under the grass on the north. A boulder beside the north-eastern stone and perhaps the large leaning stone at the south-east may have fallen from the crag above.

The name Eglwys Gwyddelod ('Irishman's Church') is unusual; the Irish are usually credited with huts rather than churches in Welsh tradition.

 

Additional photographs of Eglwys Gwyddelod Stone Circle & surrounding countryside

 

 

 

 

Views of the individual stones that make up the circle

 

 

 

 

 

Below: the white quartz stone that lies at the centre of the circle

 

Views of the surrounding countryside & the village of Pennal (last photo)

 

 

 

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Copyright 2009 by Jeffrey L. Thomas